DR KEITH HAMMETT
QSM, BSc (Hons), PhD
PLANT BREEDER

Keith Hammett logo

PHONE: +64 9 833 9453
MOBILE: +64 0210 227 4251

Sweet peas

Shopping cart is empty.
Coquette
new intro icon
$6.00
Coquette  

'Coquette' A warm coral pink, spring flowering cultivar that was most likely introduced in 1941, and has been constantly reselected in Japan. It has good stems and is well liked by florists. Sow May to September.

25 seeds per packet. Store in fridge or freezer.


Earl Grey
$6.00
Earl Grey  

'Earl Grey' is the first bicoloured flaked sweet pea. The standard petal has maroon flakes on a white ground while the wings have mauve/purple flakes on a white ground. Flowers are large and wavy. Approximately 25 seeds per packet.

Enchanté
$6.00
Enchant√©  

'Enchanté' is a tricoloured sweet pea! The standard petal is cherry pink with a large white base with pencil markings, while the wings are a soft mauve. Useful in floral work. Approximately 25 seeds per packet.

Enigma
new intro icon
$6.00
Enigma   scented icon

SOLD OUT 'Enigma' Offered for its strong unique scent. The name reflects both questions regarding parentage and breeding behaviour. Medium size flowers with intriguing pink marking. Approximately 25 seeds per packet.

Erewhon
new intro icon
$6.00
Erewhon  

It took me 30 years to develop reverse bicolour Sweet Peas, where the standard petal is paler than the wing petals. 'Erewhon' demonstrates the greatest contrast. The wing petals could be more elegant, which caused an exhibitor to say that 'Erewhon' reminded him of "a bat flying out of a sunset".

Frilly Milly
new intro icon
$6.00
Frilly Milly  

SOLD OUT 'Frilly Milly' As the name suggests, Milly is indeed frilly. This is her main attribute. The first "Spencer" Sweet Peas caused a sensation because their petals were waved in comparison with what had gone before, but nowhere near to this extent. 'Frilly Milly' has blooms that are pink flush over a cream ground and she is Spring flowering. Her main vice is that she is shy to produce seed and it may well be that it will not be viable to offer her on an ongoing basis. However, a keen gardener might like her and be able to save enough seed each season to have his or her exclusive stock? Approximately 25 seeds per packet. 

 

 

Future Shock
new intro icon
$6.00
Future Shock  

'Future Shock' Strictly Lathyrus x hammettii. An extreme morpher, think of 'Blue Vein' on steroids. A mixture of segregating lines with a pink or orange ground colour. Blue veins quickly develop, in some cases flowers becoming very dark with age. Poor seed producer so unlikely to be made available in bulk. A good opportunity for an enthusiast to select their own strain. Summer flowering. 15 seeds per packet.

Harbinger
$6.00
Harbinger  

'Harbinger' is a Spring flowering sweet pea with a maroon standard and violet wings. Similar to but distinct from the colouring of the original sweet pea. Large flowers, five or six per stem. Approximately 25 seeds per packet.

High Scent
$6.00
High Scent   scented icon

'High Scent' has been recognised as the benchmark cultivar for scent. In addition, the Royal Horticultural Society awarded it an Award of Garden Excellence. Spelling has varied, but is now standardised as High Scent. Violet flush and edging on cream ground. Approximately 25 seeds per packet.

High Society
$6.00
High Society   scented icon

SOLD OUT 'High Society' is a stunning recent introduction! A very crisp pink picotee on a white ground, five to six strongly scented frilly flowers per stem. Can be sown year-round. Approximately 25 seeds per packet.

Home Fires
new intro icon
$6.00
Home Fires  

'Home Fires' A two-tone segregating mixture of large crimson and scarlet blooms arising from 'Lipstick'. The tonality of segregating mixtures is superior to formulated mixtures of named cultivars. Four to five flowers on strong stems. Approx. 25 seeds per packet.

Kaleidoscope
$6.00
Kaleidoscope  

Often people are disappointed when they buy a packet of mixed Sweet Peas because the colour range is very limited. Kaleidoscope contains bicolours, reverse bicolours, flakes, stripes and self-colours in a wide range of shades and combinations. Approximately 25 seeds per packet.

WINTER FLOWERING SWEET PEAS

Although the original, wild Sweet Pea, Lathyrus odoratus, from which all Sweet Peas have been derived was summer flowering, strains have been developed that are able to flower at different times of the year. This is controlled by the length of daylight hours, which varies both by season and geographic location. As a rule of thumb, Summer Flowering strains require 12 hours daylight to initiate flowering, Spring Flowering strains require 11 hours, while Winter Flowering strains require only 10 hours.

SPRING & SUMMER FLOWERING SWEET PEAS

Spring Flowering types are best sown in the autumn while Summer Flowering types are best sown from mid winter in areas with mild winters like those experienced in Northern New Zealand. Spring and Summer types produce more sturdy plants, which produce strong basal shoots that soon take over from the primary shoot. Notwithstanding both the Winter and Spring strains perform very well if sown at the same time as the Summer types.

Scented SWEET PEAS

Scent is a difficult characteristic to breed. Expression of scent is very much dependant on temperature and humidity, while different people have differing ability to detect scent. Notwithstanding, Keith's work in combining the colours of the ancestral cultivars with bigger flowers and longer stems has also resulted in strongly perfumed cultivars. His 'High Scent' is recognised as the world benchmark for scent. This has smaller flowers with a clamped keel, but new introduction 'High Society' combines a waved, crisp white ground picotee edged pink flower with strong scent.

NO SOAKING REQUIRED

Very frequently, home gardeners are advised to soak seed overnight before sowing. This is unnecessary and potentially harmful for any hand harvested seed obtained from this website. Because of harvesting methods, seed from field production can on occasion result in hard seed coats, which delays or prevents germination. This is why the idea that seed needs to be soaked to identify hard seed has arisen.

Website created by Graphic Frontier site by Graphic Frontier logo